Where Is Solar Energy Illegal in the U.S.?

Where Is Solar Energy Illegal in the U.S.?

In 2020, the United States became the world’s largest energy customer, with an estimated 25% of the total energy consumed. It’s no surprise that with so much energy usage comes a major increase in solar energy installations, with a 75% rise in the last year alone.

The share of solar energy in the U.S. energy mix rose from 1% in 2009 to 5% in 2020. Now, experts are warning that if current trends continue, putting a dent in the country’s overall energy security. Experts fear that a new Energy 2020 report will reveal that the U.S. is one of the most vulnerable countries when it comes to energy security.

Where Is Solar Energy Illegal in the U.S.?

In the U.S., solar energy is generally considered to be a “good” and clean source of energy, which means that it is generally perceived to be legal. Most people assume that if it’s sunny, then they can go ahead and install a solar panel system on their houses. However, this isn’t necessarily true. In fact, putting a solar panel system on your roof could actually be illegal in some states.

In some states, such as California, it’s actually illegal to install or use solar energy devices (solar panels, roof top boxes, etc.) without a license.

Who Is Affected By This?

The good news is that this legislation is typically focused on protecting the environment and limiting energy consumption, which means that you won’t go to jail for installing solar panels. However, if you break one of the many other laws that govern your state, you could end up in legal trouble, even if you follow all the restrictions regarding solar energy.

If you live in a state where it’s against the law to install solar panels, you’re going to have a hard time understanding why it’s okay for you to use solar energy, but not okay for someone else to do the same thing. Since most people assume that it’s legal to install solar panels in their state, they might not even know that it’s illegal in some states. This can make things pretty frustrating when you’re trying to follow the law, but are being hindered by ignorant neighbors or local officials who don’t understand the law.

The Evolution Of Solar Energy In The U.S.

Depending on where you live in the U.S., the evolution of solar energy in the last few years has been anything but simple.

In 2019, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that solar energy systems had increased in size and scope, offering more options for homeowners and better functionality for businesses. Based on this, some experts predicted that 2020 would be the “biggest year yet” for the U.S. solar industry. And they weren’t wrong—between January and December of this year, there was a 75% rise in the number of solar installations, with nearly 500,000 new systems installed across the country.

Key Takeaways

So, what can you learn from all this? If you live in a state where it’s illegal to install solar panels, you’re going to have a hard time understanding why it’s okay for you to use solar energy, but not okay for someone else to do the same thing. Since most people assume that it’s legal to install solar panels in their state, they might not even know that it’s illegal in some states. This can make things pretty frustrating when you’re trying to follow the law, but are being hindered by ignorant neighbors or local officials who don’t understand the law.

Even if you live in a state where it’s not against the law to install solar panels, there might still be consequences you have to worry about. For example, if a neighbor finds out that you’re using solar energy and decides to file a complaint with the police, they could potentially charge you with violating the state’s energy laws. If this happens, your only chance of avoiding legal trouble is to prove that you’re acting responsibly and legally. So, when installing or using solar energy, you need to know what laws apply where you live.

To avoid any misconceptions and legal troubles, here’s a list of where and how solar energy is regulated in the U.S.

Solar Panels Aren’t As Safe As You Think

With all the advancements made in technology, there are many benefits to solar energy, not the least of which is how eco-friendly and safe it is. When compared to traditional energy sources such as coal and gas, solar energy is said to be up to 90% cleaner and nearly 10% safer. These numbers come from the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA), which reports that solar energy is a “clean and safe” energy source that is “essential for future energy security.”

While there are many reasons why solar energy should be considered a clean and safe source of energy, there are a few things you need to know about solar panels that could cause you some worry. The first is that not all solar panels are created equal, and some are more dangerous than others. For example, if you look at a solar panel that is wired correctly (with appropriate safety precautions), you should not have any problems. However, if the wiring is damaged or done incorrectly, you can end up with a fatal electric shock or fire.

Another potential safety risk comes from heavy particles in the air, such as dust and pollen. When these particles land on the surface of the solar panel, they can cause short circuits or break down insulation, which could lead to more serious problems. This is why it’s important to always ensure that your solar panel is clean and free of any obstructions—otherwise, this could potentially cause serious damage to your home.

State By State

If you want to follow the law and aren’t sure where to start, look no further. This page will list all the states where solar energy is legal and the laws governing its use. Keep reading for more information on specific states.

Alabama

In Alabama, it’s not against the law to install solar panels, but you must have a permit to connect the wires that connect the panels to the grid (which supplies electricity to your home). In addition, as a residential property owner in Alabama, you must provide your own electricity (at least 500 kWh of consumption per year) and are not allowed to sell your excess energy back to the grid. If you don’t own the land on which the panels are installed, you must get the written consent of the property owner before attaching the system.

As a general rule of thumb, if you’re living in an area that sees a lot of sun, then collecting solar energy is generally considered a good idea. This is due to the fact that electricity rates are on the rise and the sun is free. In 2020 alone, residential electricity prices increased by 10%, which is much higher than the national average of 3.8%. Not exactly what you want to hear when you’re trying to save money!

Arizona

In Arizona, you don’t have to get a permit to install a solar panel system, but you must have one to connect the wires that supply electricity to your home. In addition, as a residential property owner in Arizona, you have the right to sell your excess energy back to the grid. If you don’t own the land on which the panels are installed, you must get the written consent of the property owner before attaching the system.

Considering all the benefits that solar energy provides, it’s not hard to understand why this State has chosen to embrace it as a means of generating electricity. Not only is it environmentally friendly and a great source of renewable energy, but it’s also something that provides financial security—since electricity prices increased by an average of 12% in 2020, compared to the previous year, more and more Arizonans are looking to invest in solar power so they can have a stable and environmentally conscious source of electricity.

Arkansas

As in most other States, you don’t need a permit to install a solar panel system in Arkansas, but you must have one to connect the wires that supply electricity to your home. In addition, as a residential property owner in Arkansas, you must provide your own electricity (at least 500 kWh of consumption per year) and are not allowed to sell your excess energy back to the grid. If you don’t own the land on which the panels are installed, you must get the written consent of the property owner before attaching the system.

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