How Much Solar Cell Energy Will It Take to Pay Off My Solar System?

You have decided to invest in a solar energy system – great! Now you need to figure out how much energy you will need to actually pay off your investment. This article will shed some light on this topic by walking you through an easy analysis to determine how much solar cell energy your specific system will need to generate in order to pay off the investment. By understanding this number, you will have a much better idea of how long it will take to make your investment in solar pay for itself.

What Is The Best Overall Strategy For Paying Off My Investment In Solar?

To start off, it is important to realize that this question can only be answered if you know what your specific needs are. For instance, if you live in a hot climate and get a lot of sun exposure, you might want to invest in a solar system that provides more energy than you will ever use. In this case, your investment will easily pay for itself in a short amount of time. Alternatively, if you live in a cold climate and need lots of heat during the winter, you might want to consider an energy storage system like a battery or a thermal mass storage system (MTA). Investing in these types of systems will give you the flexibility to use solar energy when you have it, and when you don’t have it, the electric company will be there to provide it for you.

Once you have determined your needs, it is time to move on to the next step – finding a solar system that meets your needs. There are four basic criteria that any solar system must satisfy in order to be optimal for your application:

1. Energy Output Levels

The energy output of a solar system is measured in watts (W). A Watt is a unit of electric energy — specifically, the energy produced by one watt of electricity at a certain voltage level. For example, a 1 kW (1000W) solar system will produce 10,000 watts of electricity, a 10 kW (10000W) system will produce 100,000 watts, and a 20 kW (20000W) system will produce 200,000 watts. It is important to keep in mind that more watts means more energy but also means larger and more expensive solar systems. Additionally, as your needs increase, so too will your energy requirements. Keep this in mind as you browse through the different types of solar systems available today.

In general, your solar system should be able to produce enough energy to cover your daily energy needs. Additionally, you can use the Energy Output Level tool on the Solar System Comparisons page to filter your search results by energy levels.

2. Voltage Regulation

The voltage regulation of a solar system is measured in Volts (V). The Volts at which electricity is delivered to your home are governed by the Electricity Authority of your state or province. The voltage at which a solar system operates is typically between 12 and 22 V, though some are as high as 24 V. If you have a 16 V system, you will need a voltage regulator to step up the voltage before it is delivered to your home. Without one, you will either have a distorted image on your TV or computer monitor, or the screen will turn off altogether because the voltage is just too high! Always check this before you buy a solar system as the voltage regulation is usually indicated on the packaging or the user instructions.

As you may guess, more volts means more power but also means more expensive solar systems. The 12 to 22 V range is a very common and reliable option when it comes to solar systems as this is the range used by all major TV and computer manufacturers. If your state or province doesn’t regulate the voltage of its electricity, look for other states that do, as this will ensure that you get the correct voltage when using a solar system.

3. Maximum Power Delivery

The maximum power delivery of a solar system is measured in Amps (A). The Amps at which electricity can be delivered to your home are governed by the Electricity Authority of your state or province. The Amps at which a solar system can operate is typically between 0.3 and 0.7 A, though some are as high as 1.5 A. If you have a 0.7 A system, you will need an amplifier to increase the current before it is delivered to your home. If you have a 1.5 A system, you will need a step-down transformer to decrease the current before it is delivered to your home.

As you may guess, more Amps mean more power but also more expensive solar systems. The 0.3 to 0.7 A range is a very common and reliable option when it comes to solar systems as this is the range used by all major TV and computer manufacturers. If your state or province doesn’t regulate the power of its electricity, look for other states that do, as this will ensure that you get the correct voltage when using a solar system.

4. Weight

The weight of a solar system is measured in Kilograms (kg). The Kilograms at which electricity can be delivered to your home are governed by the Electricity Authority of your state or province. The Kilograms at which a solar system can operate is typically between 10 and 20 kg, though some are as heavy as 30 kg. The heavier the solar system, the more complicated it is to transport and install – which is why most people choose not to invest in very heavy solar systems.

As you may guess, more Kilograms mean more power but also more expensive solar systems. The 10 to 20 kg range is a very common and reliable option when it comes to solar systems as this is the range used by all major TV and computer manufacturers. If your state or province doesn’t regulate the weight of its electricity, look for other states that do, as this will ensure that you get the correct voltage when using a solar system.

Once you have found the perfect solar system for your needs, it’s time to consider the finishing touches. The location where you will install the system is also important – this should be somewhere that gets a lot of sunshine yet is still protected from the wind so that dust doesn’t settle during the day and obstruct the sun’s rays. Additionally, you might want to think about the type of terrain you have in your area as some systems are better suited for mountainous areas, and some are better for flat or hilly areas. This is sometimes a question of personal preference rather than anything major but can make a difference in terms of how much energy you get out of your system (and how long it takes to pay for itself!).

How Much Energy Does My Specific Solar System Provide?

With all that information in mind, it’s now time to determine just how much energy your specific solar system will provide. To do this, you will need to plug some numbers into a calculator. The first number you want to plug in is the Solar Yield (Solar Energy Output) value found on the Energy Output Level part of the specification sheet for your system. This number represents the amount of energy your specific solar system produces measured in watts.

The second number you want to plug in is the Maximum Power Delivery value found on the same page.

The third number you want to plug in is the voltage (voltage regulation) value found on the voltage regulation part of the specification sheet.

The fourth number you want to plug in is the Amps value found on the same page.

Once all four of these values are plugged into a calculator, the resulting number will be your estimated daily energy yield (in watts) from your specific solar system. For example, if you have a 16 V system that produces 20,000 watts (this is the Solar Yield value found on the Energy Output Level part of the specification sheet) and a maximum power delivery of 100,000 watts (this is the Maximum Power Delivery value found on the same page), then your estimated daily energy yield (in watts) is 16,000 watts. This is the result of the following calculation: 20,000 × 16 = 16,000 watts.

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