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More: MEET THE TEAM

JUSTIN BUELL
From Absarokee High School, Absarokee, Montana. Budding sports announcer. Mature and responsible - most of the time, anyway. "I play soccer a lot and collect anything of Kobe Bryant. I have type 1 diabetes, so I have to take self-injections and monitor my blood sugar. I have fun doing science, and I can usually pick it up easily... I usually like to figure things out for myself just to make sure I get the right answer."
 
JAMIE CAIN
From Belgrade High School, Belgrade, Montana. A speak-up, take-charge kinda guy. Dyed-in-the-wool hunter. Likes to joke around. "I am glad I am getting the opportunity to do this... I like to understand why things work or happen and just about everything is related to science in some way or another."
 
ERIC HELLICKSON
From Belgrade High School, Belgrade, Montana. Eric is quiet and chooses his words carefully. "Passions I pursue are getting my Eagle Scout award, becoming an engineer or architect... I also have a deep interest in demolitions... I have an unquenchable thirst for science... everything about science interests me."
 
TOM HOLGATE
From West Yellowstone High School, West Yellowstone, Montana. Clearly a man of science. Earnest, a quick learner. Would like to be a genetic engineer. "I am curious, always asking questions... I like to have structure when learning, not to have a teacher say 'go study something.' If I find something interesting that I don't know the answer to, I'll try to find out. I try to learn biology whenever possible, especially genetics. I like working together as opposed to alone."
 

SHANNON WALDEN
Biology teacher, Fort Benton Middle School/High School, Fort Benton, Montana. Also a research scientist. Her enthusiasm about biology is infectious. "My experience as a research scientist is one of constant inquiry... As a teacher I often explore new ways to cover the class material... I am fascinated by the continual unfolding of knowledge. It seems to me that to succeed in science one must be willing to be creative and push the envelope. If we don't, how will we ever get outside the box? Each time I learn about a Nobel laureate's work I am stunned with the simplicity and creativity of the project.

"Science is definitely a fluid discipline. Although the process of doing science should be static, using the scientific method, the knowledge base is always changing... Here's my favorite moment about that: one of my students asked, 'What if all the stuff we are learning changes?' I responded, 'Of course it will change. That is a constant.' It seemed to rock her and the other students quite a bit."